Visiting The Dentist? Here’s What To Expect From Your Dental Exam

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What To Expect From Your Dental Exam

Dental exams are important to your overall health and well-being, but they can also be nerve-wracking. Many people experience extreme anxiety at the thought of visiting the dentist. If you’re worried about your upcoming exam, you should rest easy. Here is what you can expect when you are at the office.

Your Teeth Will Be Cleaned

Typically, the hygienist will start by giving your teeth a good cleaning. They may also have a hygienist handle this part of your appointment. While brushing and flossing can help to keep your teeth clean, a the professional has access to powerful tools that can truly clean your teeth, like high powered water piks. Another example, they may decide to use a tartar scraper to safely remove tartar from your mouth.

If they see that you have excessive tartar, they may recommend a deep cleaning treatment that includes scaling and root planing. Tartar can increase your risk for gum disease, which is why it’s important to make sure that your mouth is truly clean.

Your Teeth Will Be Checked For Cavities And Signs Of Gum Disease

Once your mouth is clean, the hygienist will inspect your mouth for cavities and other dental problems, such as signs of gum disease. If you do have a cavity, it’s likely that your family dentist will suggest another type of treatment, like fillings or crowns. If you have gum disease, it is possible they may prescribe some sort of medication or a topical antiseptic.

If your dentist sees severe dental problems, they may recommend some sort of surgery. It’s important to schedule regular exams so that you can treat problems before they spiral out of control.

You’ll Be Checked For Signs Of Abnormalities

Many serious diseases, such as lupus and diabetes, can show up in the mouth before other parts of the body. Because of this, your dentist will check your mouth carefully for any signs of abnormalities. In addition to checking your mouth, there will be an examine of your face and your neck.  This is called an oral cancer screening, which is very important but often overlooked.

Your dental health can impact your physical health, which is why scheduling regular exams can be so important. If the hygienist or dentist examining you does see any warning signs, it’s likely that they’ll have you schedule an appointment with your doctor.

You Might Need Digital X-Rays

Not all dental issues can be diagnosed through an exam alone. In some cases, your dentist may order an X-ray or another type of diagnostic procedure. This will allow your dentist to see your teeth more clearly so that they can provide the proper diagnosis.

You shouldn’t necessarily assume that you’ll have an X-ray during your exam. If your dentist doesn’t notice any abnormalities, then they may not think that a radio-graph is necessary. With that said, these kinds of diagnostic procedures are fairly common, and you shouldn’t be surprised if you need to have an X-ray done.

These days most offices use digital X-rays, which are minimally invasive and give you a more detailed view of what is going on with your teeth.  You can learn more about the benefits of digital X-rays here https://www.sharecare.com/health/dental-oral-health-teeth/what-benefits-digital-dental-xrays

Your Dentist Will Discuss Your Dental Habits

At some point during your exam, your dentist will want to have a chat with you about your oral hygiene. They may ask you about how often you brush or floss. They may demonstrate the proper techniques for you so that they can be sure you’re flossing properly.

It’s likely that your dentist will also want to talk about your diet and your lifestyle. Many habits, like smoking or drinking soda, can cause serious damage to your teeth. Your dentist may recommend that you cut back on these habits, particularly if your teeth are in bad shape.

This is one of the things that makes many people dread seeing the dentist. After all, no one wants to be lectured about their oral hygiene. With that said, it’s likely that your dentist will provide you with a lot of valuable insight and advice. Remember, your dentist wants your teeth to be in good health. Listen to them, communicate openly, and follow the advice that they give you.

They’ll Give You Recommendations

Depending on the results of your exam, your dentist may make a few recommendations for you. They may request that you schedule an appointment for a dental procedure. It’s likely that they’ll also tell you when you should have your next exam. If your teeth are in good health, your dentist may recommend an annual exam. If you have serious dental problems, your dentist might suggest more frequent exams.

If you’ve brought up any concerns during your appointment, your professional will also make recommendations that address those concerns. For example, they might suggest cosmetic treatments, like whitening. If you have any additional questions, make sure you speak up and get the information that you need.

Don’t put off your dental exam! These exams give your doctor the chance to take a look at your teeth so that they can spot and treat problems. Most oral health issues are far easier to treat when they’re detected early.

@itschloeandemilyI’m kidding guys listen to ur dentists #fyp #dentist #twins

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Practical Tips To Take Care Of Your Teeth

Brushing your teeth is excellent, it is very important and prevents pyorrhea, but the diet factor is key. When it comes to tooth decay, cavities and holes in the teeth, the key is in the diet and in the frequency of exposure to sugar.

But just after eating, it becomes acidic, creating an environment in which your teeth begin to dissolve. So the more you peck between hours, the more periods of acidity there will be in your mouth. The general advice for teeth care is to avoid eating between meals and eating sweets after meals.

Sugar, The Great Enemy Of Teeth

The frequency of exposure to sugar is key to the development of caries. There are hidden sugars in foods that you would never expect. Milk is another food that you can betray, particularly in children: although its calcium content makes it recommended for teeth, it also contains sugar.

Some children fall asleep with a bottle in their mouth or do not brush their teeth after drinking milk, and that also contributes to the formation of cavities.

Acid, Another Enemy

If you have consumed an acidic drink, such as juice or fruit tea, it is better to drink a glass of water afterward to rinse your mouth and dilute the acid. But it is not advisable to brush your teeth during the hour after drinking an acidic drink because the acid softens the tooth enamel, and with brushing, you can damage that protective dental layer.

A Method To Brush Your Teeth Well

According to many dental specialists, it is very difficult to do well because most learn by looking at their mother and tend to repeat what she sees and catch habits from an early age.

Vegetables Against Bad Breath

To get rid of that bad smell of rotten waters, you first need to drink water, which will wash the sulfuric compounds that are generated in the oral cavity and that cause bad breath or halitosis. Then you can consume fibrous vegetables with high water content, such as cucumber, celery, or carrot.

Clean The Cleaner

In order to ensure good oral cleansing – and prevent microorganisms from popping out of the mouth – we recommend thoroughly rinsing the brushes with drinking water after brushing. This will allow removing all traces of toothpaste and food that are trapped between the bristles.

Our experts also advises soaking the brushes in an antibacterial mouthwash. It has been shown to decrease the level of bacteria that grows in the brushes. However, the brushes, no matter how well they are, have a shelf life, which can vary between three and four months or when the bristles are frayed, “whichever comes first.”

Although if the person has been ill, the specialist advises changing the brush once recovered.

Four Steps

The first would be to use antibacterial mouthwash before brushing. This can significantly reduce the burden of bacteria in the mouth and therefore reduce the microorganisms that end up in the bristles after brushing.

The expert reiterates the importance of washing hands “after using the toilet and before grabbing the brush.” This reduces the chances of oral-fecal contamination.

And finally, do not share the toothbrush. “This seems obvious, but a good number of couples admit that they share the brush.”

This means that bacteria are shared in the brushes. “Including those that cause cavities and periodontal diseases.”

The Logical Dentist

The human brain doesn’t always think logically. College students’ performance on logic problems is not a pretty sight. Steven Pinker (How The Mind Works, 1997) discusses the following student logic test: There are some archeologists, biologists, and chess players in a room. None of the archeologists are biologists. All of the biologists are chess players. What, if anything follows? A majority of students conclude that none of the archeologists are chess players, which is not valid. None of them conclude that some of the chess players are not archeologists, which is valid. In fact, one fifth claim that the premises allow no valid inferences.

Patrick Shaw (Logic and its Limits, 1997) defines a logical argument as “one which is sound; a logical person is one who habitually uses sound arguments.” Sound arguments are essential for logical decision-making. Sound arguments are progressively built, brick by brick, by assembling a string of premises that lead to a reasonable concludion. The conclusions are increasingly valuable if they stand up to observation over time. The logical argument building process often sounds like… If ‘X’ is true, and ‘Y’ is also true, therefore ‘Z’ must then be true. A sound argument can be very simple, such as:

Many animals build nests according to a pattern, which varies little within the species. In some instances, the offspring have had no opportunity to learn from their parents. There must, therefore, be at least some innate tendency controlling the activity. (An argument from Boring, Langfeld, and Weld, Foundations of Psychology, 1948.)

Premise 1: Many animals build nests according to a pattern, which varies little within the species.
Premise 2: In some instances the offspring have not been taught by their parents to build the characteristic nest.
Conclusion: There is at least some innate tendency controlling the activity.

Another example of s simple logical argument:

All fish are cold-blooded, and no whales are cold-blooded; so whales are not fish.

Premise 1: All fish are cold-blooded.
Premise 2: Whales are warm-blooded.
Conclusion: Whales are not fish.

Of course, not all logical arguments are so simple, and the task of assessing arguments– the validity of the premises and conclusions both– is a challenging one that is influenced not only by our capacity for logical thought, but also our beliefs and personal experience. Simply because an argument is formatted as ‘if… then… therefore’ does not make it a sound argument. Consider a slightly more vague argument:

Premise 1: All vitamins are nutritious.
Premise 2: Some nutritious things are not cheap.
Conclusion: Some vitamins are expensive.

Most people will hesitate to agree with this conclusion and even if it is accepted it is of marginal value due to the vagueness of both the premises and the conclusion. If any of the premises are not true, then the conclusion will likely not be true– but the argument may remain sound from a purely logical point of view. As Shaw points out: “It must be stressed that to ask whether a conclusion follows is not the same as asking whether that conclusion is true. From the point of view of logic, truth is not of immediate account. A conclusion follows from the premises in this sense: if one grants the premises then one must, to be consistent, also accept the conclusion. If the premises are true, then the conclusion must be true. Which is not to say that the premises and conclusion are true: whether or not they are is a different problem.” For example:

Premise 1: All students are teapots.
Premise 2: Our dog is a student.
Conclusion: Our dog is a teapot.

Obviously both premises are false and so is the conclusion. Yet the argument is logically sound with the conclusion properly built upon the premises. Anyone who accepts these premises would be logically committed to accept the conclusion. The lack of concern with truth can seem strange at first, but limiting logical arguments to only the realm of known truths and current beliefs would limit the boundary of useful conclusions that might be examined.

Mathematics is filled with logical arguments. You may remember from your school days such problems as this…

Bill is eight years older than John, and in two years time he will be twice as old as John. How old is Bill?

Conclusion sequence:
From premise 2, it follows that x / 2 = 2y + 4
Subtracting two from each side we get x = 2y + 2
Since y + 8 and 2y + 2 both equal x, it follows that they equal each other : 2y + 2 = y + 8
Subtracting y + 2 from each side we get y = 6
John’s age is 6 and Bill is 8 years older; therefore Bill is 14.

Mathematical logic demonstrates how a series of very trivial steps can eventually lead to an answer that is a considerable distance from the original problem. In the history of science we often observe how scientists made many observations about the Earth, assembled them into premises, and were then able to make useful conclusions.

For example, because coal seams have been found in Antartica (observation/premise), the climate there was once warmer than it is now (sub-conclusion/new premise), therefore either the geographical location of the continents has shifted (possible conclusion to test further) or the whole earth was once warmer than it is now (alterative conclusion to test). The eventual theory of plate tectonics, certainly a beautifully logical argument widely accepted today, arose from building a series of useful premises based on field observations and testing alternative conclusions.

Logic and Truth… to be continued…